Notable & Quotable on Elite Schools – WSJ.com

The WSJ’s Notable & Quotable column shares a snippet from Camille Paglia writing on August 29 in The Chronicle Review:

Jobs, and the preparation of students for them, should be front and center in the thinking of educators. The idea that college is a contemplative realm of humanistic inquiry, removed from vulgar material needs, is nonsense. The humanities have been gutted by four decades of pretentious postmodernist theory and insular identity politics. . . .

Having taught in art schools for most of my four decades in the classroom, I am used to having students who work with their hands—ceramicists, weavers, woodworkers, metal smiths, jazz drummers. There is a calm, centered, Zen-like engagement with the physical world in their lives. In contrast, I see glib, cynical, neurotic elite-school graduates roiling everywhere in journalism and the media. They have been ill-served by their trendy, word-centered educations.

Jobs, jobs, jobs: We need a sweeping revalorization of the trades. The pressuring of middle-class young people into officebound, paper-pushing jobs is cruelly shortsighted. Concrete manual skills, once gained through the master-apprentice alliance in guilds, build a secure identity. Our present educational system defers credentialing and maturity for too long. When middle-class graduates in their mid-20s are just stepping on the bottom rung of the professional career ladder, many of their working-class peers are already self-supporting and married with young children.

The elite schools, predicated on molding students into mirror images of their professors, seem divorced from any rational consideration of human happiness.

How do we teach students of entrepreneurship hands on skills? How can they be trained to imagine and create that which does not exist today? How do we teach them to create and implement a vision of the future?

via Notable & Quotable – WSJ.com.

One thought on “Notable & Quotable on Elite Schools – WSJ.com

  1. Very passionate words. Without knowing how to exactly explain why, I agree with Camille. Luckily for us, many entrepreneurs have an instinct to “create and implement a vision of the future”. It is their nature.

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